New Music and a New Music Video with help from noaccordion’s Latest Collaborators.

Noaccordion will be releasing yet another LP “Surrender” on May 18 and new collaborators will be featured on it.

Among these collaborators are:

ALEKSANDRA DUBOV (featured on “Grow”)

Aleksandra is devoted to love. Her sounds are an expression of her heart through her voice. She is a teacher that co creates spaces for people to open into full truth.

http://www.aleksandradubov.com/

Aleksandra Dubov

 

 

SKIPWICKED of Indubious (featured on “Goodness Rise Again”)

SkipWicked is co-founder, vocalist, producer and bassist of the Reggae/Rock/Rootstronica touring act Indubious. Along with his brother Evan, Indubious has been performing, producing, and touring internationally for 10 years, sharing their mystic visions of unity, acceptance of all life brings – no matter the appearance – as a blessing and a lesson. Bringing foundational roots reggae into the crown chakra with shamanic understandings and translations of the universe’s complexities, Indubious continues to blur lines between palatable, danceable, and catchy songs, with the deep dub and esoteric electronic and jam spaces. Their visionary wordplay, mixed with fiery and impressive instrumentation has landed them accolades such as a Billboard charting of #6 for their last album “From Zero”.

For more on SkipWicked, and Indubious, visit them on social media, or at www.indubiousmusic.com

Skipwicked

 

 

eO (featured on “Quick Time”)

Eric Oberthaler [eO] is a S.F. Bay Area-based producer, composer, performer and director. Having earned his B.M. at Oberlin Conservatory (1993) and M.F.A. at CalArts (1996) – both in traditional music composition – he has since honed his skills in digital audio production, sound design, mastering, music direction, and live performance. His music is immersive, his style kaleidoscopic, and his tastes broad – bridging the music of many cultures and melting walls between genres. He is currently developing innovative adaptive music systems as a natural outgrowth of his unique compositional techniques and meta-stylistic music theory.

https://eomusic.bandcamp.com/

Eric Oberthaler

 

 

MIRACULAH (Michaelah Ivie) (featured on “The Cure”)

Miraculah has been cultivating her magic powers as a Wordgician and linguistic OptiMystic who uses word play for the re~programming of consciousness. Through her poWORDful linguistTricks and empoWORDing iMAGiCnation, she inspires and invents new ways of thinking and speaking.

Miraculah

 

New Music with Freak in C: noaccordion’s Polyrhythmic Dance Tracks, Goddess-Loving Hip Hop, and Beautiful Contradictions New album Love Warrior releases Aug 18, 2016

Love Warrior LP cover
Love Warrior LP art

 

Freak in C: noaccordion’s Polyrhythmic Dance Tracks, Goddess-Loving Hip Hop, and Beautiful Contradictions

New album Love Warrior releases Aug 18, 2016

When multi-instrumentalist Onah Indigo first picked up the accordion, she had to put it down. It was heavy, awkward, annoying.

 

Yet eventually, she found an idiosyncratic stance that puts the instrument center stage, while defying its limitations. Like the push and pull of bellows, this tension generates a quirky blast of energy. Add club beats, underground MCs, freaky variations on deceptively familiar keys, a bit of surrealist wit, and a rebellious fight for greater openness, and you have noaccordion.

 

On Love Warrior (release date: Aug 18, 2016), noaccordion’s first full-length album in five years, Onah digs deep into the polyrhythms and quirky phases of the heart. She taps MCs (Sunru, Chatterbox, Delwin G), beatboxers (Mastah Lock), and musical mavericks (guitar wizard Eenor) to get the party started–and to celebrate the glories of womanhood, from the elevated to the sensual.

 

“The tracks on this album mark a major milestone in my movement toward greater confidence and joy, something I think a lot of women can relate to,” muses Onah, speaking of her journey through motherhood, divorce, renewed sexuality, and artistic transformation. “I feel I’ve grown musically stronger and set aside all my obsessions as an audio engineer. I’ve become a lot more open and playful. For me now, it’s about juxtaposition, yin and yang. It’s the light and the dark. We need to embrace both.”

 

Embracing wide ranging influences comes naturally to noaccordion. Onah got hooked on club music during the first big wave of techno, drum ‘n’ bass, and jungle that swept Europe in the early 90s. She later turned to beatmaking after the death of her second child, as a way to cope with the grief. It became a musical fascination, one she honed over the years, in response to changing sounds on the electronic music scene, sounds that come through loud and clear on the trap-inspired instrumental “Frey”.

 

Rhythmic experiences from other traditions and genres, from samba to jazz, have infiltrated her beats, expanding the 4/4 tendencies of many club tracks. “I want to feel the internal pulse in my body,” Onah explains. “When you’re in a samba band, you dance as you walk to the beat. You internalize the pulse and then lay your polyrhythms on top,” an approach that creates intriguing tracks.

 

Like the club music and hip hop that inspired the album, noaccordion’s music is made to get people moving, while delivering a message of liberation, self-love, and sheer delight. “I’ve got a huge connection with movement and sound,” she says. “I can’t sit still when I’m playing. I’m going to embody that pulse in some form of movement.”

 

Hence the accordion, which, despite the project’s name, pops up on several tracks (“Trouble” and “Mama Nature”): It allows a keyboard player to move. But the instrument has a charisma all its own, one that Onah does not want to overshadow her work.

 

“I call my project noaccordion for a reason. People have strong reactions to the instrument. Most people love it; it often reminds them of their cultural past. But some people can’t stand it. It’s a particular sound, designed to be played outdoors and loudly,” she says. “I may not play it a few years from now. It may not appear in my repertoire. I don’t want to be defined by it.” But of course, sometimes noaccordion includes accordion: “I like to break rules,” laughs Onah. “Even my own.”

 

Though Onah’s songs, performances, and engineering are the heart of noaccordion, she brings friends and kindred spirits into the mix, fellow musicians from the Oakland underground with distinct voices and visions. They include vocalists like Sunru, featured on Love Warrior’s opening track. “He’s phenomenal. I needed someone who could pull off a Rick James-style vocal. He was the only one I could think of. We had a blast. He has to be one of the most unique guys, and his freestyle ability is amazing, hip hop meets metal.” Or Chatterbox, a puppeteer, MC, and environmental activist who connected instantly with Onah, thanks to his love of accordion. (He shines on “Mama Nature.”)

 

There’s a musical thread tying the tracks together, a harmonic choice that reinforces Onah’s call for self-discovery, for finding extraordinary strength and new insights in the ordinary. “Conceptually, these ten songs were all written in C, but the modes are each different,” she explains. “It adds to the strange harmonies that might sound a little unusual to some listeners. I’ve always had this weird relationship to C; I thought it was boring. But there are endless possibilities in each key. I’m finding the freak in the key of C.”

 

Finding the freak in plain sight is part of accepting freakiness and growing in love. “I had a huge heart opening a few years ago,” Onah recounts. “I’ve learned to that to keep my heart open I must maintain a fierceness. A warrior’s love. Even if people are knocking me down, I fight to stay in that place of love, starting first and foremost with myself.” It’s a fight worth fighting, and one that resonates beautifully on the dancefloor.